Monthly Archives: October 2012

“You are my life” but I don’t know if it means what it says.

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This post is in response to yet another Google user searching for a Nepali translation and landed themselves here at my blog. Days like this leave me shaking my head in disbelief and saying to the Universe, how is it that part of my life now involves trying to translate things into Nepali for complete strangers…no matter, THANK YOU UNIVERSE, that this is indeed part of my life.
I digress, because the verb “to be” is so difficult to figure out, I’ll give you readers a few ways to say this. One way would be to say, “Timi mero zindagi ho.” This exactly means, “you, my life, are.” I use Timi form and ho form here. Although, I am assuming that if you are telling someone they are your life, you are comfortable enough with them to use the informal peer, Timi form. Ho is used to mean that the state is permanent, again assuming that this phrase of endearment would not be slapped on someone with the “cha” form as “cha” implies a temporary state. If for some reason you are trying to say this to a person you are less than familiar with, you could say, “Tapaii mero zindagi hunuhuncha.
This is a very exact way of saying this and I feel like in Nepali it would be awkward to word something in this way. I wonder if the use of Malai or Timle is better. I am unfortunately terrible at using these words and frequently get them backwards. I think that you could say, Timle mero zindagi ho, but still think that all of these methods really don’t do the phrase justice.
The implication of the phrase, “you are my life” is to say that without you, my life is nothing. That sends with the message many connotations that life is meaningless in your absence, or without you I am incomplete. I believe that these phrases may better translate to the romantic gesture the reader is attempting to make.
For example, “without you, I am incomplete” may be Ma timi na sanga, maile adha hun. but then again, maybe I’m wrong about the maile part.
At this point, I fear confusing the readers any more than I already have so I’m calling it quits for the night. Nepali speakers, chime in. Otherwise, hope this answers your question Google searcher.

The word matra.

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This post is in response to a google search that brought someone looking for the word Matra. I believe this word means source lists matra as the word for “only”. Another use of the word is matrai, but I don’t fully understand the difference between the two. 

Pharkaunu

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Pharkaunu translates as to return or to come back. I suppose that is a fitting title for my returning post. I’ve been absent for a couple of months, mostly because of a dose of heartbreak and the simultaneous injection of extra work that came around the same time.

First of all, Shiva has taken off back East. I suppose I should be glad that when I say East, I’m referring to the Eastern coast of the US and not all the way back to Nepal, but really I’m just bummed that he’s gone. He got a scholarship deal he couldn’t pass up and in less than a month of telling me about it, he packed up all but the two boxes still at my place and jumped on a one way plane flight. Plenty of tears, him, my daughter, me…its been hard. We talk most every day for hours at a time and still support each other emotionally, but there is something about going to sleep every night far away from your love that is painful.
My little one is very upset. She spends much of her time lamenting Shiva’s absence and the new default cry for when she isn’t getting her way is “I want Shiva back.” Thankfully, he is respecting his roll in her life to the greatest degree he ever has. When he calls and she wants to talk he has meaningful loving conversations with her. When she is sobbing for him and refuses to eat or even get off the floor, he takes the call and calms her down and explains that he still loves her, but that he has to go to school. For some reason, she just needs to hear this from him. I couldn’t be any happier that he’s owning up to fulfilling the emotional needs she has developed for him.
At first I was really mad at him and slowly that anger turned to the sense of emptiness that I now feel. If I knew he was coming back, the pain would be less, but he promises never to return. He says he hated it here and is so glad he left. I’m not sure if its the optimist in me or the idiot that sits back and says, “he’s fickle, he’ll change his mind.” Maybe its both.
And as though the Universe was aware that this situation was going to be taxing, it felt necessary to throw on to me the additional work load that doubled the number of hours I spend working each week. Perhaps this is a gift in covering for the loss of Shiva’s financial support or maybe its a way for us all to take our mind off the pain. But it feels like just another test, another way for the Universe to remind me that I am capable of more than I want to be. A test to remind me that there are those things out of my control and that acceptance is the only path to peace. Perhaps its the anchor tying me down enough that I can’t follow Shiva across the country again because the Universe knows that isn’t the right path for me.
All I know is that for a few moments since August, I can breathe and welcome my return to normalcy.

Collectivist vs. Individual? Guess I’m both.

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This self-assessment estimates your level of individualism and collectivism. At one time, experts thought that these two cross-cross-cultural values were opposites. Now, we understand that they represent separate values that are generally unrelated to each other. Each scale has a potential score ranging from 8 to 40 points. Higher scores indicate that the person has a higher level of each cross-cultural value.


   
Low
individualism
8-22
Moderate
individualism
23-30
High
individualism
31-40
   
8 40

Your score was 31. The range of possible scores is from 8 to 40.

Individualism
Individualism refers to the extent that you value independence and personal uniqueness. Highly individualist people value personal freedom, self-sufficiency, control over their own lives, and appreciation of their unique qualities that distinguish them from others. The following graph shows the range of individualism in general. However, keep in mind that the average level of individualism is higher in some cultures (such as Canada) than in others.


   
Low
collectivism
8-22
Moderate
collectivism
23-30
High
collectivism
31-40
   
8 40

Your score was 35. The range of possible scores is from 8 to 40.

Collectivism
Collectivism refers to the extent that we value our duty to groups to which we belong, and to group harmony. Highly collectivist people define themselves by their group membership and value harmonious relationships within those groups. The following graph shows the range of collectivism in general. However, keep in mind that the average level of collectivism is lower in some cultures (such as Canada) than in others.

 

the test can be found here: http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0070876940/student_view0/chapter2/activity_2_6.html

Translation Project – Sunsan Yo Raat – James Shrestha

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Heard this song on Kalika FM today and fell in love with it and was thankfully able to find out who sings and find a place to download the song. (No thanks to iTunes..cuz i never find Nepali music there, or Google for protecting YouTube copying). Anyway, part of my learning system is through singing and now, thanks to his video on YouTube, I am provided with Roman transliterated lyrics making translation SOOOO much easier. This may take a little work but here are the lyrics provided (and slightly altered where my own ears and need for meaning changed a few spellings) and my attempts at translation. Of course any and all suggestions, corrections, or help in general is most welcome.

sunsan yo raat    (this silent night, in the dead of the night?)
sunsan sahar  ( silent city city)
koi pani chaina outside (no one is outside)
to have some fun
eklo chu mah (alone i am)
eklo yo raat ma (alone is the night)
timi aau ani deu (you come and let)
malai timro tyo saath (be my friend, be with me?)
so timi najik aayie (you najik close to, aayie=come—“you come close to me”)
mero yo haat samayie (i’ve got time on my hands, i’ve got plenty of time)
mero yo angalo ma (in my embrace)
angalo hali achi ( embrace hali achi)
so timi najik aayie (so you come here)
mero aakha ma heri (command form: look into my eyes, would be here and not heri or maybe heri a conjugation of hernu meaning, saw you in my eyes?)
timro tyo oath le (your promise to me)
mero oath lai chumi (my oath for you chumi — wondering if thise could be, you promised me a kiss? maybe if i make a promise to you then you promise me a kiss?)
babbaal cha life
enjoy tonight
garnu parcha moj masti  ( like to savor)
and have some fun every night
so timi najik aayie (so come close)

mero yo haat samayie (got time on my hands)

mero yo angalo ma
angalo hali nachi
so timi nagik aayie
mero yo haat samayie
mero yo angalo ma
angalo hali nachi
so timi nagik aayie
mero aakha ma heri
timro tyo oath le
mero oath lai chumi
so timi nagik aayie
so timi nagik aayie
ekanta ma basera hami (alone we were
maya ko kura gari (love talking
joon ra tara haru here (moon is but all we see, “we watched the moon and stars)
rah ah ah ah
romantic mode ma (in a romantic mood)
aakha mathi akha ma (i see upon your eyes)
film ma jastai bhayo raat ma (an image of the night)
hamro maya (our love)
sadhai yestai rahus (everything the same)
juni juni
mayalu (lovely)
mero maan lai niyali hera (the person for me destined for me)
mero maan ma aayie (my {one}  person has come, you came into my heart?)

basera sadhai aau sdhai (and always come always)
merai bhayera
babbaal cha life
enjoy tonight
garnu parcha moj masti (i like to savor)
and have some fun every night
so timi nagik aayie mero yo haat samayie
mero yo angalo ma
angalo hali nachi
so timi nagik aayie
mero aakha ma heri
timro tyo oath le
mero oath lai chumi
so timi nagik aayie
so timi nagik aayie
sunsan yo kalo raat (silent is the black night)
sahar ko bich ma hami dui saath (the city’s net is our friend)
maya ko nasha ma dubeko mutu
matra sundai chu dil ko dhuk dhuk
yeah
hami kati nagik
timi mero angalo ma
badha chaina kunai kura ko pani
tesailay aau naacha mah sanga
yo raat ma
chandra maa pani khusi cha
timro muskan lakhau ma yek
timro roop lai heri rakhnu maan lagney
chahindaina aru koi timi bayek
cute cha hamro jodi
future ko barema sochney ho bhaney
lets spend the rest of our lives together
baby will you marry me?
mero maan lai niyali hera
mero maan ma aayie basera
sadhai aau sadhai merai bhayera
so timi nagik aayie mero yo haat samayie
mero yo angalo ma
angalo hali nachi
so timi nagik aayie
mero aakha ma heri
timro tyo oath le
mero oath lai chumi
so timi nagik aayie
so timi nagik aayie

and for those interested, here is the video. 

special thanks to Zoe. I included your thoughts up in the ongoing translation project. I really appreciate your help. Most of the things you listed were things that were exceptionally tough for me. I’m glad that it was confusing to someone with so much more Nepali knowledge because I felt lost with many sentences, especially the one about mero aakha ma heri.