Category Archives: Language Learning

More lyrics to translate — Farkeara Na Aau — Alish Bikram Shah

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Chorus:
Malai chodeara jau,sara sansaar hasau
Kalpana jai belau tara farkeara na aau
Yaada Bani Na Aau,Sapani ma Na Aau
Bihani Ko Woojeanima Malai Na Beujhyau

Verse:1
Samaya tyo theyo jaba huntheu hami saath maa
nachutiney bacha gartheu hami harek raat maa
lukai afno najar timle chumtheu mero ooth maa
Ti kasam ti bacha hamle racheko katha

timlai yaad cha ki chaina hami mettheu ek arka ko betha
bhana aaj khai k bhayo timilai maya
artha bujhera ni kina bhaeu yeti dherai tada
rachechu maile yi sabda timro yaad maa dubera

sochera aaj asu jharcha maya fakau kasari
sayad yestai rahecha prem ko artha bhani bujau yesari
garho cha yo maan lai timi bina samalna
galti bhaeu mero nabhuji prem lai aangalna

birsana sakney chaina ma kahile timro yaad haru
badlidai gaye pani mausam ko harek ritu
metney chaina kahile pani yi adrishya ghau haru
metney chaina kahile pani yi adrishya ghau haru

Chorus:
Malai Chodeara jau,sara Sansaar hasau
Kalpana Jhai Belau Tara Farkeara Na Aau
Yaada Bani Na Aau,Sapani ma Na Aau
Bihani Ko Woojeanima Malai Na Beujhyau

Verse:2
suntheu aaj kaal timle kina po mero bhawana
chadi gayo timi mari mero harek sapana
ma ghumekai thiyi woripari timro pagal sari
tara kina chodeu timle mero saath aaj ekkashi

maya garchu bhani timi gaeu nisthuri bani
kina chodeu timle haath saath dinchu bhani

timi nai ta theyoo mero ankha ki nani
thapi dai cha sabda haru prem ko jhuto kahani maa

jaleko cha maan aaj timro prem ko natak maa
garthey maya dherai timlai tara timle bujenau
sacho maya barnan garda timle kahile sunenau
chokho maya maan bhitra ko timle kahile dekhenau

birseu timle kasam khako hamle deurali maa
ghantau ghantau ghumi bastheu hami chautari maa
bujey kai thiye maile timro harek chahana
bhana k paeu timle chodna lai bahana

Chorus:
Malai Chodeara jau,sara Sansaar hasau
Kalpana Jhai Belau Tara Farkeara Na Aau
Yaada Bani Na Aau,Sapani ma Na Aau
Bihani Ko Woojeanima Malai Na Beujhyau

Verse
Samjhi rahechu ma biteka dinn haru
hamle bitayeka sangai ramaila pal haru
timi bina kasari katu yo aadheri raat haru
aajhai aalai cha timle diyeka chotharu
garho cha timi bina yo maan lai samalna
bhana k garu aba yo maan lai bhahaalauna
timi bina aadhuro lagcha yo sansaar
chadera gayou timi aaj prem ko durbar
k kami payou timle bhana mero maya maa
aasu jharecha aaja,aaja timro yaad maa
lekhechu yo geet timro maya maan maa rakhera
maya garchu timlai hera yo sansaar tyagera
biswas chaina bhaney hera yo chati chirera
maya tyagi gaeu timi aaj malai chadera
jani najani angalyou betha sabai bhulera
aaj pokhdaichu betha afno yo geet gayera
YEA!!!!

Chorus:
Malai Chodeara jau,sara Sansaar hasau
Kalpana Jhai Belau Tara Farkeara Na Aau
Yaada Bani Na Aau,Sapani ma Na Aau
Bihani Ko Woojeanima Malai Na Beujhyau*2

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Oh that Malai, Maile, business again!

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Tonight, I met a guy from Nepal working at a restaurant. He introduced himself as “I am from Nepal.” and I bounced out with, “Ma Nepali seekdaichhu.” (I’m learning Nepali.”) His face looked surprise, but I thought, you are the one who brought this up, I didn’t ask where you were from. Then I asked his name, which I thought I understood, but had a hard time clarifying with him so I took a pen and wrote it down in Devanagari to clear it up. He seemed even more surprised and exclaimed, “You can write this way!” to which I answered, “ali ali” (little bit). Before I left, I said, “Tapaii malai betera kushee lagyo.” which I’m pretty sure means, “You are happy to meet me,” even though what I meant to say was “Tapaiilai betera kushee lagyo.” meaning, “I’m happy to met you.” He just smiled, in a boyish way and said, “Yes” which kind of threw me off. Here’s to that malai stuff messin’ me up again.

Blown away by Women LEAD

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Story Telling Workshop on January 7th/8th.

All I can say is read through the amazing exercises they are doing with middle school girls in KTM. I’m sure this is just the surface of what is sure to be a life altering relationship between these young girls and this amazing organization.

Aba, ma chahanchhu mero English lyrics utha garna lae Nepali.

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jãã icchaa, tyãã upaae: Where there is a will there is a way. 

Mero upaae, hamro gaana gana. (My plan, our song includes: My plan includes our song) Tara, malai kehi tapaiiko guhaar chahincha. (But I need your help.)  Ke tapaen male sahayog garnu huncchha? (Will you all help me?)

Malai usle gaaunu hamro gaana Nepalima, ma guhaar aghi utha garnchhu. For me to sing him our song in, I need to translate the lyrics first.

Keep in mind these are incredibly personal lyrics, written and sung only for my Shiva, but to do this right, I want to sing them in Nepali. This isn’t exactly how the song goes, but its a better less artistic form. I’ll attempt my own translations where possible. Here it goes:

Why would we put a limit on infinity?
Kina (why) hami(we) anta(limit) lai(for?) infinity?

Why put a range on possibility?
Kina chahanchhu simaa lai sambhaabanaa?
Why want to limit on possibility?

I don’t get it, why would we?
Ma aundaina ( I don’t know) kina hami garchhau (why we would do?)
What is the reason to bound our chemistry?
Hijo ke kaaran(what is the reason) barnu(to fence) hamro(our) chemistry?
Why would be bind our affinity?
Kina hamilai gaara hamro affinity?

Cannot put a range on our love eternally
When will you recognize
we’ve hit the nth degree. (being a play on math equations using n as a variable…have ZERO idea how to include a reference like that in Nepali, but if that part stays english, its alright)
Just when falling into despair
we go walking, no, dancing on air
With defenses waning, but not giving a care.

This feels like approaching infinity
why not give in to this feeling
We have to admit
that its good to be.

I know you are worried my hopes can’t be met
And I know I don’t have you convinced
Abandoning fears over an outcome is best
Let’s just appreciate being blessed.
Let our hearts be open and not be repressed.

This looks like blinding infinity,
why would we want to put restraint on this imagery
let’s both admit, there is more to see.

I know all day you’re busy daydreaming.
So am I.
And symbiotically, we are designing our reality.
Who incepted this love
you or me?

Hello Friend (Multi-lingual Edition)

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Someone found their way to my site today by Googling “hello friend in many languages” and although I’ve already addressed “hello friend” in Nepali, I thought I would address this in every language I can say this phrase in.

“Namaste Saathi” -Nepali

“Namaste Mitra” – Hindi

“Hola, Amigo(a)”- Spanish

“Bonjour mon Ami” – French

“Jambo, Bwana” – Swahili

“Ni Hao, Pengyou” – Mandarin

“Hallo, Freund” – German

Mero agaadi post Nepalimaa. (My first Nepali post)

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Uninterrupted post:

Maph garnus, ma Nepalimaa “post” bhanna audaina. Taipani, ma kosis garna mero eka nambara garnu. Paraghaun, parasata ma patyaunchhu yo garchhu. may dara lagyo. Kina? Ma kunni. ma galata dara lagyo holaa chhu. Yo, ma balla-balla garchhu. Akhira, ma chutauna. Ma thakaai lagyo. maile tapaiinlai sahii garnus.

 

My attempt at self-translation:

Maph garnus, ma Nepalimaa “post” bhanna audaina.(Forgive me, I do not know how to say “post” in Nepali.) Taipani (however), ma kosis garna (I will try) mero eka nambara garnu (to do my best). Paraghaun (after two years), prasasta (enough) ma patyaunchhu (I am confident) yo garchhu ( to do this. )

Ma dara lagyo (I am scared). Kina?(why) Ma kunni. I do not know why.) Ma galata dara lagyo holaa chhu. (it is probably because I am scared to be wrong) Yo, ma balla balla garchhu.(I do this with great difficulty). Akhira (finally), ma chutauna (I give up). Ma thakaai lagyo. (I am tired) Maile tapaiinlai sahii garnus. (Will you please correct me?)

What I meant to say:
Forgive me, I do not know how to say “post” in Nepali. However, I will try to do my best. After two years, I am confident enough to do this. I am scared though. Why? I don’t know. Maybe it is because I am afraid to be wrong. It is very hard to write all this. Finally, I give up.  I am tired. Will you all please correct me?

Maybe its holaa, Maybe its kunni.

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Finally, a new search term for a Nepali word that I haven’t already addressed. (Don’t worry all you, “How do I say ‘sweet’ in Nepali?” people, you aren’t alone!) So here we go, to address, “maybe.”

The first source I checked. leaves me with finite verb+holaa as the way to say maybe. I do not know what I finite verb is and trying to understand definitions of a finite verb do not offer much certainty. A root of a verb in whatever tense it should be? Here’s a link if you would like to understand what a finite verb is. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finite_verb

Anyway the sentence that was given as an example of “maybe” is this, “Bhaat paakyo ki paakena?” asking “Is the food ready?” and the reply, “Paakyo holaa.” meaning, “maybe it is,” or more appropriately, “probably it is.” The difference between probably and maybe get sort of confusing here, I suspect, they are relatively based on inflection and not just in the words. 
Another word I found is “kunni” which can be used as maybe, but more directly translates to, “who knows? I don’t know, or no idea.” And is more or less an indirect way to answer a question one doesn’t want to be bothered answering. This reminds me of the English phrase, “I guess so.”

Hello, My Friend! (Nepali edition)

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I’ve been encountering some writer’s block lately. I log on, thinking I’ve got something to write about, and then it just sounds like nothing, so I delete it and move on. Lately, even the Google searches leading readers here have been of no use. Today, I was glad to see a post I could actually address. How to write “Hello, my friend” in Nepali.
The user already knew how to translate this sentence into “Namaste, mero saathi.” (though, they spelled this phrase differently.) Anyway, its easy enough to offer a Devanagari script version: नमस्ते मेरो साथि This is very formal language for a friend. If you are speaking with someone you are very close with, may I suggest, के छ? Or Ke Cha, which pretty much means, What’s up?

“You are my life” but I don’t know if it means what it says.

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This post is in response to yet another Google user searching for a Nepali translation and landed themselves here at my blog. Days like this leave me shaking my head in disbelief and saying to the Universe, how is it that part of my life now involves trying to translate things into Nepali for complete strangers…no matter, THANK YOU UNIVERSE, that this is indeed part of my life.
I digress, because the verb “to be” is so difficult to figure out, I’ll give you readers a few ways to say this. One way would be to say, “Timi mero zindagi ho.” This exactly means, “you, my life, are.” I use Timi form and ho form here. Although, I am assuming that if you are telling someone they are your life, you are comfortable enough with them to use the informal peer, Timi form. Ho is used to mean that the state is permanent, again assuming that this phrase of endearment would not be slapped on someone with the “cha” form as “cha” implies a temporary state. If for some reason you are trying to say this to a person you are less than familiar with, you could say, “Tapaii mero zindagi hunuhuncha.
This is a very exact way of saying this and I feel like in Nepali it would be awkward to word something in this way. I wonder if the use of Malai or Timle is better. I am unfortunately terrible at using these words and frequently get them backwards. I think that you could say, Timle mero zindagi ho, but still think that all of these methods really don’t do the phrase justice.
The implication of the phrase, “you are my life” is to say that without you, my life is nothing. That sends with the message many connotations that life is meaningless in your absence, or without you I am incomplete. I believe that these phrases may better translate to the romantic gesture the reader is attempting to make.
For example, “without you, I am incomplete” may be Ma timi na sanga, maile adha hun. but then again, maybe I’m wrong about the maile part.
At this point, I fear confusing the readers any more than I already have so I’m calling it quits for the night. Nepali speakers, chime in. Otherwise, hope this answers your question Google searcher.

Pharkaunu

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Pharkaunu translates as to return or to come back. I suppose that is a fitting title for my returning post. I’ve been absent for a couple of months, mostly because of a dose of heartbreak and the simultaneous injection of extra work that came around the same time.

First of all, Shiva has taken off back East. I suppose I should be glad that when I say East, I’m referring to the Eastern coast of the US and not all the way back to Nepal, but really I’m just bummed that he’s gone. He got a scholarship deal he couldn’t pass up and in less than a month of telling me about it, he packed up all but the two boxes still at my place and jumped on a one way plane flight. Plenty of tears, him, my daughter, me…its been hard. We talk most every day for hours at a time and still support each other emotionally, but there is something about going to sleep every night far away from your love that is painful.
My little one is very upset. She spends much of her time lamenting Shiva’s absence and the new default cry for when she isn’t getting her way is “I want Shiva back.” Thankfully, he is respecting his roll in her life to the greatest degree he ever has. When he calls and she wants to talk he has meaningful loving conversations with her. When she is sobbing for him and refuses to eat or even get off the floor, he takes the call and calms her down and explains that he still loves her, but that he has to go to school. For some reason, she just needs to hear this from him. I couldn’t be any happier that he’s owning up to fulfilling the emotional needs she has developed for him.
At first I was really mad at him and slowly that anger turned to the sense of emptiness that I now feel. If I knew he was coming back, the pain would be less, but he promises never to return. He says he hated it here and is so glad he left. I’m not sure if its the optimist in me or the idiot that sits back and says, “he’s fickle, he’ll change his mind.” Maybe its both.
And as though the Universe was aware that this situation was going to be taxing, it felt necessary to throw on to me the additional work load that doubled the number of hours I spend working each week. Perhaps this is a gift in covering for the loss of Shiva’s financial support or maybe its a way for us all to take our mind off the pain. But it feels like just another test, another way for the Universe to remind me that I am capable of more than I want to be. A test to remind me that there are those things out of my control and that acceptance is the only path to peace. Perhaps its the anchor tying me down enough that I can’t follow Shiva across the country again because the Universe knows that isn’t the right path for me.
All I know is that for a few moments since August, I can breathe and welcome my return to normalcy.